The Easy Way To Learn To Play
1321 Upland Drive, Houston, Texas 77043

Christmas Guitar Songs

christmas-guitar-songsA wonderful collection of Christmas classics in this course. I’ve arranged each one to include the melody line inside the chords so each song will be instantly recognizable when you play it for loved ones at that special time of year.

Having the melody line makes all the difference in the world when playing guitar for others.

Course Details

  • Running time: 1hr 38min
  • 15 video lessons
  • Course book (TAB)
  • Works with iPad/iPhone/Android

What You Will Get From This Course

  • A timeless collection of Christmas favorites to play forever more
  • Easy arrangements of each one using open chords and easy to play keys
  • Melody lines, chords & bass all combined together for a complete sound
  • Step-by-step video instruction walking you through how to play each classic

Who Is This Course For?

Beginners are not advised to take this course. It’s best suited to players who can already change chords reasonably well and have some experience with fingerstyle playing.

 

Curriculum

Video 1: O Come All Ye Faithful (written around 1743) [9:34]

Video 1.1: O Come All Ye Faithful – Part 2 [5:06]

Video 2: What Child Is This? (dates back to 1865)[7:18]

Video 3: Angels We Have Heard On High (around 1840) [10.59]

Video 4: We Wish You A Merry Christmas (no one knows for sure but historians have traced it back to 16th century England) [8:22]

Video 5: The First Noel (dates back to at least the 17th century) [5:16]

Video 6: Joy To The World (1719) [9:03]

Video 6.1: Joy To The World – Part 2 [2:59]

Video 7: Hark! The Herald Angles Sing (earliest version found 1739) [8:50]

Video 7.1: Hark! The Herald Angles Sing – Part 2 [7:25]

Video 8: Good King Wenceslas (first published 1853 but probably written earlier) [9:27]

Video 9: Deck The Halls (the melody dates back to Wales in the sixteenth century, the words were written much later) [9:21]

Video 9.1: Deck The Halls – Part 2 [3:04]

Video 10: Auld Lang Syne (lyrics written in 1788, the melody goes back much further) [9:05]

Video 10.1: Auld Lang Syne – Part 2 [3:09]